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Sigur Rinde - Barely Repeatable Processes


Its time to challenge the assumptions that software are built upon. We like to upgrade the hardware every time a faster CPU sees the light of day while we happily use business software that is an
implementation of methods that are not younger than 515 years (double entry book keeping is the absolute "latest").

Later, industrial thinking added a slightly different approach to the same methods; obliging enterprise software to focus on efficiency; making parts of the enterprise "run faster from point A to point B". However, they don't address the fundamental organizational effectiveness questions such as "does it make sense running to point B in the first place?"

Combine these basic traits and you get systems where complexity explodes, focus is wrong and the practical end result arguably not as it should be:

Today's enterprise software systems can only handle Easily Repeatable Processes, but not Barely Repeatable Processes, the former creating only 30% of World Wide GDP, the latter is where twice the amount of value is created while essentially using manual and heavily resource-consuming methods to drive the workflow.

This presentation will challenge the very core of current software architecture and make a case for a totally different approach - that not only will allow new innovation but which will have an upside of
about 70% world wide GDP increase at current resource-use levels.


Sigurd Rinde is the founder of Thingamy Ltd (http://thingamy.com) and numerous other companies. Born in Norway he's educated at ETH Z├╝rich and INSEAD Fontainebleau while now living in France.
He's been active in doing leverage buyouts, Merger & Acquisition advisory and have founded a string of companies in areas like M&A advisory, brokerage, electronic games and enterprise software.
Sigurd's an active blogger (http://blog.thingamy.com) and is a member of Enterprise Irregulars (http://enterpriseirregulars.com). His time off is spent cycling, orienteering, skiing and other sports.

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